Author

Angelo M. Codevilla

Angelo M. Codevilla is a senior fellow of the Claremont Institute and professor emeritus of International Relations at Boston University.

 

He received his B.A. from Rutgers University, an M.A. from Notre Dame University, and his Ph.D. in Security Studies, U.S. Foreign Policy, and Political Theory from the Claremont Graduate School.

At Boston University since 1995, Professor Codevilla has been a U.S. Naval Officer, an Assistant Professor at the Grove City College and North Dakota State College, a U.S. Foreign Service Officer, and a member of President-Elect Reagan's Transition Teams within the U.S. Department of State. He dealt with Western Europe and with matters affecting the U.S. Intelligence Community. He served as a U.S. Senate Staff member dealing with oversight of the intelligence services, a professorial lecturer at Georgetown University and a Senior Research Fellow for the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

On Amazon.com:

 

Speaking Topics

  • Missile Defense
  • National Security
  • Israel

Articles by Angelo M. Codevilla

Make America Victorious Again

Make America Victorious Again

Trump’s virtue in foreign policy lies in having voiced this simple, vital thought: U.S. foreign policy must put America first...
After the Republic

After the Republic

Regardless of the election’s outcome, the republic established by the founders is gone.
Spies Like Us

Spies Like Us

A review of Secrecy and Democracy: The CIA in Transition, by Stansfield Turner
Courtiers

Courtiers

A review of Barack Obama's Post-American Foreign Policy: The Limits of Engagement, by Robert Singh; Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, David E. Sanger; Bending History: Barack Obama's Foreign Policy, by Martin S. Indyk, Kenneth G. Lieberthal, and Michael E. O'Hanlon; and The Obamians: The Struggle Inside the White House to Redefine American Power, by James Mann
The Lost Decade

The Lost Decade

Sixteen years after 9/11, America has neither peace nor victory.
Why We Don’t Win

Why We Don’t Win

Nearly a decade after 9/11, the U.S. government hasn’t managed to ensure our peace, safety, and freedom.
Transcendental Hustlers

Transcendental Hustlers

A review of Freedom Just Around the Corner : A New American History: 1585-1828 and Throes of Democracy: The American Civil War Era, 1829-1877, by Walter McDougall
Making War

Making War

A discussion between Bret Stephens and Angelo Codevilla
Inside the Box

Inside the Box

A review of Terror and Consent : The Wars for the Twenty-First Century, by Philip Bobbitt
Intelligence Failures

Intelligence Failures

The CIA serves not the United States but its own corporate interests and its partisan vision.
Get Serious

Get Serious

Schlesinger's book is a sad testament to the state of the modern academy.
When the Cheering Stops

When the Cheering Stops

The battle of Iraq is one victory in a war on terror that began on September 11.... The war on terror is not over; yet it is not endless.
Confusion and Power

Confusion and Power

The worst policy for the United States is to combine the unbridled tongue with the unready hand.
War At Last?

War At Last?

President Bush must commit to war and kill the causes of terrorism.
The Path To Victory

The Path To Victory

American people do not live surrounded by a moat, which means that there are 10,000 concentrations of people every day
What War?

What War?

The Bush team's conduct of the "war" made the Arab world less afraid of America.
Wake-Up Call

Wake-Up Call

Kagan's explanations of and remedies for military unseriousness are not what one would expect from a great student of Thucydides.
Volume XX, Number 4, Fall 2020

To get our entire new issue, full of incisive commentary on the events of the fall, click here.